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Trump might halt birthright citizenship as presidency wanes

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President Trump could outlaw birthright citizenship — a long-promised victory for his base — in a last-minute govt order, in line with stories.

The Division of Justice has been requested to weigh in on the authorized implications of an order ending an automated proper to US citizenship for youngsters born on American soil to unlawful immigrants and short-term guests, The Hill reported.

The transfer, one in all a number of govt orders into account by the Trump administration in its last weeks, would arrange an early immigration headache for President-elect Joe Biden — and will spark a authorized struggle that conservatives have been spoiling for.

The legality of birthright citizenship has been presumed below the language of the 14th Modification for many years. But it surely has by no means been thought of by the Supreme Court docket or confirmed below federal regulation.

The Trump administration imposed visa restrictions on pregnant ladies in January in an effort to stamp out “start tourism” — a profitable enterprise that guarantees US citizenship to the kids of well-off dad and mom in China, Russia and elsewhere.

A stock image of a pregnant woman.
Getty Photographs

Trump steadily railed towards birthright citizenship for unlawful immigrants throughout his first presidential marketing campaign in 2016.

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Unqualified au pairs are slipping via the cracks amid COVID-19

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Troublemakers are out and about because the pandemic has plunged the au pair business into chaos.

In June, the Trump administration signed a brief ban till a minimum of Dec. 31 on the au pair visa program — which guarantees inexpensive little one care in alternate for room, board and a modest stipend for host households — due to COVID-19 job issues. In consequence, there’s a scarcity of certified, authorized, international au pairs.

“This system has been paused precisely on the time when American households are struggling to remain at work with many colleges and day cares closed,” Michael McHugh, senior vp at New York-based Au Pair USA for host households, informed The Publish.

From a peak of 20,000 final yr, in response to US State Division information, the variety of obtainable
au pairs now in America has sharply declined. One placement company not too long ago confessed to a New York household that its provide was down from a whole bunch of au pairs to 5. And among the many au pairs who had been already within the US when the ban got here down are some who aren’t minimize out for the job.

Final month, Mattress-Stuy residents Lauren and Mark filed a grievance with the Higher Enterprise Bureau in opposition to AuPairCare, the San Francisco-based company they contracted to supply an au pair for his or her son, who was born in April.

“She confided to us she had no expertise caring for newborns, opposite to what the company assured us,” Mark informed The Publish of the 20-something from Brazil who joined his family in July. (She first got here to the US on an au pair work visa final November.)

He mentioned the girl additionally appeared to have little curiosity in working as a baby carer — regardless of the very fact her visa, which continues to be doubtlessly renewable, is conditional on her working as an au pair.

“[She] requested us if she might get a [side] job as a bartender as a result of she is aware of of locations that ‘rent illegals for a lot of these jobs,’ ” wrote Mark in his grievance. “You possibly can think about the priority that came to visit us as we heard that our au pair needed to work inside a bar illegally throughout COVID, and doubtlessly placing our well being in danger.”

The household needed to let the au pair go after solely three weeks, as their nervousness grew about her credentials and loyalty.

“AuPairCare didn’t do its due ­diligence,” Mark added in his grievance, “when it matched us with an au pair who by no means deliberate on being an au pair, however was solely utilizing the visa to get into [the US].”

The couple are in search of a full refund of the almost $4,000 they paid AuPairCare, as a substitute of the partial refund and credit score provided. “Nobody [at Au PairCare] has returned a name or an e-mail,” Mark mentioned.

In an announcement to The Publish, ­AuPairCare mentioned that as a result of it “values the privateness of all our members, we’re unable to deal with your particular inquiry. Our prime priorities stay the well being, security, and well-being of each our au pairs and host households.”

Mark, who works in public relations, realizes he isn’t the one mother or father stressed by a defiant caretaker. “[Our former au pair] mentioned quite a lot of au pairs will not be following COVID-19 guidelines,” he informed The Publish.

One Morningside Heights mother or father, who wished to stay nameless, concurred.

“Our au pair didn’t appear to grasp how harmful COVID was,” the daddy informed The Publish. “This frightened us as a result of she would go away the home for hours, was gone the entire day on weekends. We didn’t know who she was seeing. So we ended up not renewing the au pair after her settlement was up in Could.”

“Our au pair needed to work inside a bar illegally throughout COVID.”

 – Brooklyn dad, Mark

Vanessa Gordon, a Hamptons resident and mom of two younger kids, mentioned she’s shocked by a change she’s now seeing within the ­demeanor of au pairs.

“It’s simply so unimaginable how these au pairs barely take note of the youngsters — they allow them to go to the toilet in the course of the playground, although there’s a public restroom 100 ft away.
A lot of the au pairs are on their cellphones 90 % of the time,” Gordon, who publishes East Finish Style Journal, informed The Publish.

She chalks it as much as there being fewer au pairs obtainable within the US. “Companies are letting the issue instances — au pairs who don’t have any curiosity or expertise in doing the job — slip via the cracks to fulfill excessive parental demand, with households sucking it up as a result of they ­typically don’t have any different alternative.”

Mark and Lauren have now employed a neighborhood nanny who lives together with her family in Brooklyn. “[My friends and I] can’t take our kids to day care facilities — they’re not protected and never even open,” he mentioned. However “there’s no approach on the planet we’d ever rent an au pair once more.”

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Megan Fox, Mindy Kaling hit by alleged Ponzi-scheming PR exec: lawsuit

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An alleged Ponzi-scheming public relations exec apparently ensnared actors Megan Fox and Mindy Kaling in his web of deceit, claims a Manhattan firm which says it was duped out of $2.5 million in the con.

Hotshot marketing guru Andrew Garson, who in July 2018 was named to the “Top 40 under 40” list by PR Week Magazine, was indicted on wire fraud charges last year for allegedly conning his bosses at MWW Group to pay debts he owed vendors at a previous company, according to court papers.

But Garson’s money machinations at MWW went even further, the company charges in a $10 million Manhattan Supreme Court lawsuit.

The Long Island man allegedly created budgets for “fictitious” marketing campaigns, and incurred debt to talent like Fox and Kaling on projects or budgets MWW hadn’t approved.

The scam left MWW fielding lawsuits and demands for payment the company knew nothing about, including $450,000 from Fox, according to court papers.

Andrew Garson
Andrew GarsonTwitter

In some cases, Garson is accused of making agreements on behalf of MWW that exceeded budgets the company had set, leaving the firm holding the bag for the overage, including $1.75 million to Kaling, who in 2018 starred in an MWW ad campaign for Barefoot Wine, the company claims.

Garson also misappropriated monies working on projects for various advertising clients, including $58,000 from Jack in the Box, $125,000 with Red Lobster and $270,000 from Cox Automotive, MWW charges.

The criminal charges against Garson are pending.

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Wilton Gregory makes historical past as first Black American cardinal

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Washington Archbishop Wilton Gregory made historical past Saturday, changing into the primary Black American to earn the rank of cardinal.

Pope Francis bestowed the rank on the 72-year-old Gregory together with 10 different new cardinals at St. Peter’s Basilica, in a ceremony marked by face masks and chairs 6 toes aside, The Washington Publish reported.

Gregory stored his face masks on when he kneeled for Francis to placed on his crimson hat; many of the others took theirs off. The pope stored along with his observe of not sporting a masks.

After the ceremony, Gregory talked in regards to the significance — and timing — of his appointment.

“Among the many folks that have congratulated me and wished me properly, buddies and colleagues, I’ve heard this: It’s about time,” he stated throughout a video convention. “However additionally it is an necessary recognition that the African American, the Black Catholic neighborhood, is a crucial part throughout the bigger, common church.”

Gregory spoke of being a “voice for the African American neighborhood within the Pope’s ear.” His new rank provides him a better profile and extra affect — at a time when racial tensions are excessive within the US, significantly over police killings of Black males.

Of the Church’s 229 cardinals, Francis has appointed 73 who’re below 80. variety of Francis’ appointees are from South America and Africa, recognition that the Church’s energy base has shifted from Europe.

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